Great Quote About the Calming Effects of Tea

There's a Great Deal of Comfort in a Cup of Tea

Quote About Tea
This morning, my trip to the grocery store wasn’t as uneventful as it normally is. Seems my car’s brakes forgot how to do their job.  Thankfully when I first noticed their sudden case of amnesia I was in a parking lot so I was going really slow.  So thankfully I didn’t hit anyone or anything.

Just as it approaches that time of year when my brain begins to think about the holidays, Christmas shopping, and all the wonderful things that come from September – December… that’s when my car says, “You know what’d be cool right now? A big fat Mechanic Shop bill!”

It has such a sick idea of good times.

As soon as I got back home, I did the only thing I could do or needed to do.  I poured myself a big tall glass of sweet tea and everything was right with the world again.

Tea is the comfort food of drinks, isn’t it?  I love it for that.

The quote at the top is from a great book I recently reviewed on my tea blog. The book’s aptly titled Tea Wisdom and it’s absolutely a little beauty.  Click the title to read more about this book and see more tea quotes.

As for me, I think my day calls for another pot of tea.

Occupations with High Rates of Substance Abuse (Infographic)

Based on The National Survey on Drug Use and Health

Occupations with High Rates of Substance Abuse
If you find yourself in a battle with substance abuse, don’t try to fight it alone! Formidable foes (which “abuse” of any kind certainly qualifies for) call for more than just one hero. Contact someone in your community and/or click through the infographic shown above for more information.

When it comes to standing up to any sort of abuse (mental, substance, physical..) there’s power in numbers. Repeat after me: I don’t have to do this alone!

Thou Shalt Not Whine by January Jones

Thou Shalt Not Whine! Advice for Growing Older without Whining From Author January Jones

In the hilarious, yet equally thought-provoking, book Thou Shalt Not Whine, author January Jones reminds us of a pit people tend to fall into as they grow older. They tend to complain (yes, maybe even whine) about their age. They often develop a mindset of expecting others to do things for them…

Why? Because they’re old.

Some expect to be able to get away with rudeness…

Why? Because they’re old.

Many will complain, at great length, to anyone and everyone about their aches, pains, creaks, and… yes… even bathroom visits.

Why?  Oh, you know.

January Jones, in a witty, insightful style that’s all her own, has this great advice for people who complain about getting older: She suggests to simply stop looking in the mirror and to act any age you choose – preferably the age you remember as the best time of your life.

Beautiful.

Read my Thou Shalt Not Whine Review on Self Help Daily.

Thou Shalt Not Whine: The Eleventh Commandment: What We Whine About, Why We Do It and How to Stop is available on Amazon (paperback) and is also available for Kindle – meaning you can start laughing right away!

The secret of success is learning how to use pain and pleasure instead of having pain and pleasure use you… If you don’t, life controls you.  – Anthony Robbins

How to Make it Through the First Year of Sobriety (Special Article)

Help for Those Re-Covering from Addiction

Below is an article that’s being shared with Self Help Daily’s readers who, quite possibly, find themselves fighting for a better life.  Sometimes you need a little help when fighting worthy opponents – fortunately, help isn’t just out there, it’s readily available!

How to Make it Through Sobriety      Sobriety Help
The risk of addiction relapse is highest during the first year of a recovering addict’s sobriety. Acute withdrawal from alcohol or drugs may last only about a week to 10 days, but even after acute withdrawal ends, a recovering addict may continue to struggle with feelings of depression, mental fogginess, memory problems and other symptoms of post-acute withdrawal syndrome or PAWS. These symptoms may last throughout the first year of sobriety.

Recovering addicts may also struggle in their first year of sobriety because they lack the coping skills they need to deal with normal life challenges and stress — and the first year of recovery is a time of high stress. Most newly sober addicts are still reeling from the loss of what had become their only source of pleasure and comfort — substances. In addition, they’re also dealing with the emotional fallout of their addiction and may be facing, for the first time, the emotional pain that first led them to abuse drugs and alcohol.

In order to make it through the difficult and emotionally fraught first year of recovery, addicts need to attend an inpatient rehab program. However, the work doesn’t end when rehab does — in many ways, it’s just beginning. Addicts leaving rehab need to have a continuing care plan in place that includes the 12-Step program, outpatient counseling and a basic understanding of self-care.

Inpatient Treatment Can Make or Break Your Recovery

For the addict who truly wants to get and stay sober, inpatient treatment should be the first step. In order to be effective, a residential addiction treatment program should last at least four weeks. Many programs last as long as 90 days, and some will allow patients to remain in the facility for as long as they and their counselors see fit. A 90-day stay in an inpatient rehab facility can lay a solid foundation on which you can build a lifetime of sobriety. Not spending enough time in inpatient treatment, or skipping it altogether, however, can derail your recovery before it even has a chance to get under way.

Spend Time in Sober Living

You should think twice about heading straight home and jumping right back into your regular routine the minute you leave your inpatient treatment facility. If you’re like many recovering addicts, you’ll be facing the demands of the world while completely sober for the first time in years. You need some time to adjust to functioning in society again in a sober environment where you can continue to enjoy some protection from temptation.

Entering a sober living facility for a month or two will make it easier for you to focus on re-adjusting to normal life, since you won’t have to worry so much about resisting temptation. It will take the pressure off your loved ones, too, since they won’t have to worry about watching you for signs of substance abuse. Many sober living homes also offer some level of addiction counseling.

Participate in the 12-Step Program

One of the biggest advantages of the 12-Step program is its size — no matter where you are, you will have access to a meeting. Many addiction experts and recovering addicts recommend that people new to recovery attend 90 meetings in 90 days. While this might seem like a lot of meetings, it’s an important way to establish a sober support network for yourself, in the form of sober friends and a sober sponsor and begin learning how you can navigate the ups and downs of life without substances. Once the 90 days are over, you can attend less often as long as it doesn’t compromise your recovery.

Stay in Counseling

While you’ve no doubt made significant progress in uncovering the roots of your substance abuse disorder in counseling during your inpatient treatment program, you will need continued counseling to completely resolve these issues. You may choose an outpatient treatment program, where you continue to go to group and individual counseling at night for three to five days a week. Alternatively, you may begin seeing a counselor who specializes in addiction issues one-on-one. The important thing is that you continue with therapy. Many recovering addicts stay in therapy even after the first year of sobriety is up.

Take Care of Yourself

The most important thing you can do to help yourself through the first year of your sobriety is to learn about the symptoms of PAWS and what to do about them if you recognize them in yourself. Even if you do not develop PAWS symptoms, you need to focus on caring for yourself physically and emotionally from now on. Make getting enough sleep, exercising, eating right and making time for the things you enjoy a priority in your life. As a recovering addict, it’s especially important that you rediscover how to take pleasure in normal, wholesome fun again, so make time every day to do things you enjoy. Keep trying out new things, too — you might just discover your next favorite hobby.

The first year of recovery is the hardest. In order to make it through your first 12 months of sobriety, you’re going to need to commit to working hard at your recovery every day. It won’t be easy, but in the end, it will be worth it.

Get a Life Without Sacrificing Your Career

How to Make More Time for What’s Really Important (Book Excerpt)

Bonuses come upon the completion of projects.  Signed contracts come at the end of negotiations.  Points go on the scoreboard only when the runner crosses the goal line.  One thing completed is worth ten things on hold.  Incomplete tasks can make you feel depressed and wasted; you will feel energized after completing them.  –  Get A Life Without Sacrificing Your Career: How to Make More Time for What’s Really Important by Dianna Booher.

This excerpt is a perfectly eloquent reminder that tasks we have yet to complete zap our energy and leave us feeling overwhelmed and under-motivated.  Un-done tasks stare at us, mockingly, while they kick dirt on our self confidence and self worth.

Fortunately the story doesn’t have to end there.  Self confidence and self worth will get a much-needed boost the instant we take one of these un-done tasks and turn them into a done task.  Remarkably, the minute you begin to chip away at something, you find energy you didn’t even know you had.

From the Back Cover:

Hop off the treadmill without losing career momentum! Do you remember leisure-fondly? Do you remember when there was time to stop and smell the flowers and to evaluate what was really worth doing? NOT just another guide to cramming even more activities into an already packed schedule, this book shows busy professionals how to: Discover your real priorities and follow your star to fulfillment; Loosen the constricting bonds of obligation; Remove negatives from your life to make room for happiness. With inspiration, wisdom, and nerve, this book treats time as the profound gift it is. An internationally recognized communications expert and writer of 28 books, Dianna Booher gives you practical suggestions for handling the complexities of life and finding real joy.

 

How to Get Work Done When You Don’t Fell Like Working (at all!)

When Your Give a Dang Can't Be Found

Funny Quote About Work
Ever have one of those days when you just flat don’t want to do anything. As in anything at all – unless, of course, lying on the couch watching TVLand counts.

I don’t know about you, but I find that I’ve always got time for and interest in Andy and Barney.

Funny, though, the same can’t always be said for housework, writing, laundry, etc.  Those of us who work from home (in my opinion) have a tougher time than most. Let’s face it, if we don’t feel like working, we simply don’t.

Cue the whistling and tell Andy and Opie to grab their fishing rods.

Of course, people get sick of work whether they work outside of the home or inside of it. Why? Well, most of the time work just isn’t fun… but unfortunately, it has to be done.

A problem most people run into when they don’t feel like working is they wait for the feeling to hit them.  They mutter around, wondering, “Why don’t I feel like doing anything today?” or “What’s wrong with me?”  Those of us who fancy ourselves writers may even resort to the famous self-diagnosis, “I have writers” block!”

Basically, we’re all saying pretty much the same thing, “This is not fun and I don’t want to do it!

When we turn our attention away from “that which must be done” and point it toward ourselves, we’re actually causing more problems.  In a way, we’re giving ourselves an out….

  • “I’m overwhelmed… I guess I need a break.”
  • “Actually I need another vacation.”
  • “Heck, maybe I need another job.”
  • “I’m so overwhelmed, I’m just going to call it a day.”
  • “All this work CANNOT be good for my health.
  • “Why’d I ever sign on for this?!”

If any of these sound familiar to you, congratulations, you’re human.

The key to getting work D-O-N-E when you don’t feel like D-O-I-N-G it is to.... are you ready for this??… simply DO something – with something being relevant to the task at hand, not watching Andy Griffith, playing Solitaire, or surfing the web. Unless of course someone’s paying you to do these things, in which case, you are my idol.

Truth be told, DOING SOMETHING is actually the answer to just about every problem known to mankind. Rarely does just sitting around, self-analyzing yourself accomplish anything of real value.

The next time you find yourself asking the questions above (you know, the ones with “out” written all over them), silence them with action. Just do something productive – getting something accomplished beats self paralysis by self analysis any day of the week.

My favorite trick for doing this is to simply devote 10 minutes at a whack.

Example: A few days ago, I was in one of those ruts we looked at above. Didn’t want to do any of the 20+ things on my to do list.  I decided to take the first one on the list and promise 10 minutes to it. Anyone can promise 10 minutes to something, right?  The great thing is, once you’ve started, you will finish even if you exceed the 10 minutes.  After I began the task, within 20 minutes it was done and scratching it off of my list was almost as satisfying as a Chai Tea Latte.

Almost.

Take emotion out of the equation when your mind tells you that you “just don’t feel like” doing something that has to be done. When it says, “I don’t feel like doing this,” respond with, “Oh, that’ okay, you don’t have to feel like it to do it…”‘

Then set your timer for 10 minutes and get ‘er done.

The Blender Girl (Review on “Get Cooking”)

Get Cooking's Review of The Blender Girl
July 31, 2014

Vegetable Smoothie

Here’s a link to a review I wrote on my food blog – it’s for a visually beautiful and nutritionally bountiful cookbook, The Blender Girl by Tess Masters. This cookbook is currently the #1 Bestseller on Amazon for Blender Recipes and it’s little wonder. The recipes are excellent and the advice is priceless.

See: The Blender Girl Review on Get Cooking!